Today's Trending Searches

How Samsung’s New Galaxy S10 Compares to the iPhone XS Max

Thu, 21 Feb 2019 02:47:31 -0500

How Samsung’s New Galaxy S10 Compares to the iPhone XS Max(Bloomberg) -- The Samsung Galaxy S10 is actually four separate phones: the S10e (the “e” stands for “essential,”) the S10, the S10+, and the S10 5G. The first three go on sale in March, and the S10+ is the flagship of the trio. 


Exclusive: China's Dalian port bans Australian coal imports, sets 2019 quota - source

Thu, 21 Feb 2019 02:45:15 -0500

Exclusive: China's Dalian port bans Australian coal imports, sets 2019 quota - sourceCustoms at China's northern Dalian port has banned imports of Australian coal and will cap overall coal imports for 2019 through its harbors at 12 million tonnes, an official at Dalian Port Group told Reuters on Thursday. The indefinite ban on imports from top supplier Australia, effective since the start of February, comes as major ports elsewhere in China prolong clearing times for Australian coal to at least 40 days. Coal is Australia's biggest export earner and the Australian dollar tumbled on the news, falling more than 1 percent to as low at $0.7086.


Remain or leave? Carmakers confront hard Brexit choices

Thu, 21 Feb 2019 02:19:50 -0500

Remain or leave? Carmakers confront hard Brexit choicesST ATHAN, Wales/GAYDON, England (Reuters) - In three cavernous former Royal Air Force hangars at an old airbase in Wales, luxury carmaker Aston Martin is forging ahead with construction of a new vehicle assembly plant. The paint shop is in, robots are being unpacked, and production of the company's critical new sport utility vehicle is on track to start this year – Brexit deal or no deal. "I still have to believe that we'll get to a proper and right decision because a no-deal Brexit is frankly madness," Aston Martin CEO Andy Palmer told Reuters at the company's Gaydon headquarters in England, where designers are working on a diverse lineup of vehicles for the 2020s and beyond.


Johnson & Johnson receives federal subpoenas related to baby powder litigation

Thu, 21 Feb 2019 01:19:58 -0500

Johnson & Johnson receives federal subpoenas related to baby powder litigationThe disclosure in Johnson & Johnson's annual report on Wednesday is the first time that the company disclosed it had received subpoenas from federal agencies regarding its talc powder products. The Justice Department declined to comment and the SEC did not immediately respond to requests for comment. A Reuters report on Dec. 14 revealed that Johnson & Johnson knew for decades that small amounts of asbestos, a known carcinogen, had been occasionally found in its talc and powder products, according to tests from the 1970s to the early 2000s - information it did not disclose to regulators or the public.


Google's new cloud boss has big task to catch rivals, Reuters data show

Thu, 21 Feb 2019 01:11:31 -0500

Google's new cloud boss has big task to catch rivals, Reuters data showAlphabet Inc's cloud computing division remains a distant third behind Amazon.com Inc and Microsoft Corp in terms of global revenue, according to analysts' estimates. A few major companies manage their data on Google's servers. While not comprehensive, the data provide a window into Google's challenge.


Hurricanes create natural climate change labs in Puerto Rico

Thu, 21 Feb 2019 00:36:28 -0500

Hurricanes create natural climate change labs in Puerto RicoEL YUNQUE, Puerto Rico (AP) — The hurricanes that pounded Puerto Rico in 2017, blasting away most of its forest cover, may give scientists clues to how the world will respond to climate change and increasingly severe weather.


Neptune's smallest moon may have been created by comets

Thu, 21 Feb 2019 00:28:20 -0500

Neptune's smallest moon may have been created by cometsWe're all made of star stuff, but some things in the universe are created by comets. Neptune's recently discovered and smallest moon, Hippocamp, has been confirmed and observed in detail by the Hubble Space Telescope according to new research published in Nature on Wednesday. SEE ALSO: Neptune looks extremely sharp and very blue in these latest images Named Hippocamp for the half-horse, half-fish creature from Greek mythology — all of Neptune's moons are named for Greek and Roman mythological figures — it's the smallest of the planet's seven inner moons, with a diameter of approximately 20-21 miles (34 kilometres).  How have we never met Hippocamp before? The planet's other six small inner moons were picked up in a 1989 fly-by from the Voyager 2 spacecraft, but Hippocamp was missed.  Between 2004 and 2009, the Hubble picked up a "white dot" from 150 images, and in 2013, Mark Showalter of California's SETI Institute officially discovered the moon by analyzing the photographs and plotting its circular orbit.  Hippocamp was officially confirmed in the study published Wednesday by Showalter alongside Imke de Pater from the University of California, Berkeley, Jack Lissauer of NASA's Ames Research Center, and R. S. French of SETI. While there are three Hubble programmes dedicated to studying Neptune's rings, arcs and small inner moons, the study's authors had to develop their own specialised image processing techniques to focus on the inner satellites, including Hippocamp, because of their speedy orbits.  With these new techniques, the team were able to confirm not only that Neptune officially has 14 moons, but how the smallest was likely formed. Part of another moon? Hippocamp sits in orbit near Proteus, the largest and outermost of Neptune's moons. In fact, the study's authors suggest Hippocamp could be derived from Proteus, as an ancient fragment of it.  "The first thing we realized was that you wouldn't expect to find such a tiny moon right next to Neptune's biggest inner moon," study author Showalter said on NASA's blog.  "In the distant past, given the slow migration outward of the larger moon, Proteus was once where Hippocamp is now." This diagram shows the orbits of several moons located close to the planet Neptune. Image: NASA, ESA, and A. Feild (STScI) The inner moons are thought to be younger than Neptune, having formed after the capture (a successful pull into orbit) of Neptune's largest moon, Triton.  But according to the study, each inner moon has likely been fragmented by comet impacts, including Proteus, which sports the enormous Pharos crater thought to be unusually large in relation to the size of the moon, and possibly created by a comet. "Based on estimates of comet populations, we know that other moons in the outer solar system have been hit by comets, smashed apart, and re-accreted multiple times," said Lissauer.  "This pair of satellites provides a dramatic illustration that moons are sometimes broken apart by comets." It's this type of comet impact that the authors hypothesise could have released debris from the moon, which then settled into orbit and gradually accreted (formed) into Hippocamp. According to NASA, astronomers refer to it as "the moon that shouldn't be there." A pretty violent way to be born, but there it is. WATCH: Elon Musk says Mars round trip could cost only $100,000 one day


Trump’s Pick To Lead Climate Panel Once Compared CO2 To Jews In Nazi Germany

Thu, 21 Feb 2019 00:15:23 -0500

Trump’s Pick To Lead Climate Panel Once Compared CO2 To Jews In Nazi GermanyWilliam Happer, President Donald Trump's reported pick to lead a new panel onclimate change, is a science denier with a history of controversial comments


Climate Change Is Causing Ocean Colors To Intensify: MIT Study

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 23:22:39 -0500

Climate Change Is Causing Ocean Colors To Intensify: MIT StudyScientists say the colors of the world's oceans will intensify by the end ofthe century due to climate change, threatening the marine ecosystem from thebottom up


Commodities giant Glencore to cap coal output over climate

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 22:33:40 -0500

Commodities giant Glencore to cap coal output over climateBERLIN (AP) — Commodities giant Glencore said Wednesday it will cap how much coal it mines amid shareholder pressure for it to help reduce global emissions of greenhouse gases.


Foldable Phone Frenzy Is Supercharging Gains in Chinese Stocks

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 22:31:54 -0500

Foldable Phone Frenzy Is Supercharging Gains in Chinese StocksFellow display producer BOE Technology Group Co. has jumped 46 percent since the start of year. Turnover in both stocks soared as investors bet on hefty demand for screens, especially if Chinese smartphone makers like Huawei Technologies Co. follow Samsung into foldable models. More than $612 million worth of Tianma shares traded Wednesday, about 18 times the daily average turnover for last year, while over $1 billion of BOE shares traded every day in the past week in Shenzhen, far outdoing Tencent Holdings Ltd., Asia’s biggest stock by market value.


Lenovo's Mobile Profits Are a Bit of a Mirage

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 22:17:11 -0500

Lenovo's Mobile Profits Are a Bit of a MirageFour years after closing its acquisition of the Motorola phone brand, Lenovo Group Ltd. has finally posted a profit in its mobile-phone business. The deal closed in October of that year, meaning that it took 16 quarters to turn a profit.


Samsung Revamps Flagship Range With 5G, Low-Cost Options

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 21:48:37 -0500

Samsung Revamps Flagship Range With 5G, Low-Cost OptionsThe South Korean technology giant introduced four new phones in its Galaxy S range -- the S10, S10+, S10e, and S10 5G. The S10 and S10+ are direct successors to last year’s S9 and S9+, while the S10e and S10 5G are two new models for the company: a low-end phone aimed at Apple’s iPhone XR, and a high-end version priced above $1,000. It also showed off the Galaxy Fold, a smartphone with a screen that expands to tablet size.


Would You Rather Fly Boeing or Airbus? World's Longest Flight Fuels Rivalry for Deal

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 21:15:03 -0500

Would You Rather Fly Boeing or Airbus? World's Longest Flight Fuels Rivalry for DealThe Australian airline plans to fly non-stop from Sydney to New York and London by 2022, marathon routes that will be the world’s longest commercial services. As the two aerospace giants pitch to supply planes for the flights, Qantas Chief Executive Officer Alan Joyce is squeezing the arch-rivals for every dollar to make ‘Project Sunrise,’ as he calls it, viable.


Google Takes New Policy Approach Amid Growing Global Threats

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 20:31:41 -0500

Google Takes New Policy Approach Amid Growing Global ThreatsIn an internal email, the company’s new global policy chief, Karan Bhatia, described the reorganization as a reaction to policy makers who are increasingly empowered to regulate the company’s core businesses, said the person, who asked not to be identified discussing personnel decisions. Bhatia, a former deputy U.S. trade representative under Republican President George W. Bush, joined Google in June from General Electric Co. He is bolstering teams that deal with specific challenges such as antitrust and privacy, while others will focus on particular regions or product lines, the person said.


Irish Woman Cuts Off Her Own Finger in Search of Relief From Chronic Pain

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 20:16:58 -0500

Irish Woman Cuts Off Her Own Finger in Search of Relief From Chronic PainA woman with complex regional pain syndrome amputated her finger in search of relief from her pain.


Tortoise feared extinct found on remote Galapagos island

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 19:26:04 -0500

Tortoise feared extinct found on remote Galapagos islandLIMA, Peru (AP) — A living member of species of tortoise not seen in more than 110 years and feared to be extinct has been found in a remote part of the Galapagos island of Fernandina.


Lesbians more likely to be overweight as experts find sexuality is linked to health

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 19:01:00 -0500

Lesbians more likely to be overweight as experts find sexuality is linked to healthLesbian and bisexual women are more likely to be overweight than heterosexual women, research has shown for the first time, as experts said sexual identity should now be viewed as a health risk factor. Researchers at the University of East Anglia studied 12 British national health surveys involving more than 93,000 people which recorded body mass index (BMI) and sexuality and found a striking link between weight and sexual orientation. For women, being gay made them 41 per cent more likely to be overweight or obese, which equates to an extra eight gay women of an unhealthy size in every 100 compared to heterosexual women (65% compared with 57%). Bisexual women were 24 per cent more likely to be overweight or obese, however for men the opposite was the case, with gay men at three times the risk of being underweight. “This is worrying because being overweight and obese are known risk factors for a number of conditions including coronary heart disease, stroke, cancer and early death,” said lead researcher Dr Joanna Semlyen, from the University of East Anglia's Norwich Medical School. “Conversely, gay and bisexual men are more likely than heterosexual men to be underweight, and there is growing evidence that being underweight is linked to a range of health problems too, including excess deaths. “We also found that gay men are significantly less likely than straight men to be overweight or obese. “This study demonstrates that there is a relationship between sexual identity and BMI and that this link appears to be different for men and women.” BMI calculator According to the most recent figures from the Office for National Statistics, the percentage of people identifying as lesbian, gay or bisexual is now 2 per cent of the population in Britain, although the Treasury has put the figure at 6 per cent, or 3.6 million people. London had the largest proportion of the population who identified as LGB (2.7 per cent), and the east of England had the lowest (1.2 per cent). Researchers are unclear what is driving the increased risk, but say that gay people are more likely to experience social stress and live less healthy lifestyles. The new results showed that more than one third of gay people smoke, compared with around one quarter of straight people.  Likewise 48 per cent were living with a long standing illness compared with 28 per cent of heterosexuals. Dr Semlyen, added: “We know that sexual minority groups are more likely to be exposed to psycho-social stressors, which impacts on their mental health and their health behaviours such as smoking and alcohol use, and which may influence their health behaviours such as diet or physical activity. “Routinely asking or recording sexual orientation would go some way to address this for LGB people, and at the same time, would lead to a better understanding of health inequalities experienced by this population.” The research was published in The Journal of Public Health. Sign up for your essential, twice-daily briefing from The Telegraph with our free Front Page newsletter.


Qualcomm’s Bid to Settle U.S. Monopoly Case Hits Roadblock

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 19:00:47 -0500

Qualcomm’s Bid to Settle U.S. Monopoly Case Hits RoadblockThe company has yet to win over a majority of the U.S. Federal Trade Commission and top agency officials despite making significant progress in the talks, according to people familiar with the process. Both sides are attempting to reach an agreement before a judge rules in the agency’s lawsuit accusing Qualcomm of abusing its market dominance, said the people, who asked not to be named because they didn’t have authority to speak publicly about the matter. Any settlement decision rests with four members of the five-member commission -- two Democrats and two Republicans -- because the Republican chairman, Joseph Simons, is recused.


The $32 Trillion Pushing Fossil Fuel CEOs to Act on Climate Change

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 19:00:01 -0500

The $32 Trillion Pushing Fossil Fuel CEOs to Act on Climate ChangeGlencore made its decision after facing pressure from a shareholder network known as Climate Action 100+, which has the backing of more than 300 investors managing $32 trillion. The group was founded a little over a year ago, but has already extracted reforms from oil heavyweights, like BP Plc and Royal Dutch Shell Plc. “If Glencore says that it doesn’t see coal having a growing future than other people will stand up and take notice,” said Edward Mason, the head of responsible investment at the Church Commissioners for England.


Australian Rat Declared Extinct Due To Man-Made Climate Change

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 18:18:10 -0500

Australian Rat Declared Extinct Due To Man-Made Climate ChangeBramble Cay melomys lived on the coral island of Bramble Cay, located in theTorres Strait between Queensland state and Papua New Guinea


This gorgeous Moon shot took 50,000 individual photos to create

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 18:14:13 -0500

This gorgeous Moon shot took 50,000 individual photos to createWe've seen some pretty stunning images of the Moon over the years thanks to high-powered imaging tools from NASA and other space agencies, but you don't need a massive observatory just to create a gorgeous picture of Earth's closest neighbor. Photographer Andrew McCarthy produced the incredible Moon image you see above (and here, in full resolution) using a Sony camera and a standalone ZWO astronomy camera that you can buy yourself for under $300.The catch? Well, the image isn't a single photo but the result of some 50,000 individual photos snapped, studied, and then stitched together. That's a lot of work for a single image, but the result suggests it was more than worth it.There's a ton of detail in the final 81-megapixel image, and you could stare at it for a while and still notice new features that jump out at you from the Moon's surface. It's a gorgeous image, and it took plenty of work to make it happen."The lit side of the moon was processed using 25 'tiles' that were stitched together in Photoshop," McCarthy told PetaPixel. "Each 'tile' was a stack of the best 50% of 2000 images captured with the ZWO. The dark side is around 13 tiles, each with the best of around 50 images. The stars were captured with a stack of 50 shots with the Sony."The resulting image was then tweaked for contrast until McCarthy was happy with its look. The image is sharp enough to see lots of tiny features on the Moon's surface while balancing both the lit and shadowy sides so we can see as much as possible.


Lyft Plans to File for IPO as Soon as Next Week

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 18:04:03 -0500

Lyft Plans to File for IPO as Soon as Next WeekLyft, which announced in December that it had filed its IPO application confidentially with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, intends to list its shares on the Nasdaq market, the person said. A spokeswoman for San Francisco-based Lyft declined to comment. The details of the companies IPO plans were reported earlier by Reuters and the Wall Street Journal.


What You Need to Know About So-Called 'Zombie' Deer Disease

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 17:41:01 -0500

What You Need to Know About So-Called 'Zombie' Deer DiseaseFirst off, they aren't actually zombies.


$400 billion climate investment plan for Sahel region

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 17:37:04 -0500

$400 billion climate investment plan for Sahel regionHeads of state of 17 countries in the Sahel region of Africa will hold a summit on Monday in Niamey to approve a climate investment plan worth $400 billion over 12 years, the Niger government said Wednesday. The "ambitious" plan for the period 2018-30 will involve "17 nations from the Atlantic Ocean to the Horn of Africa" and will represent the "translation (into actions) of our nations' commitments through the Paris agreement on climate change", Environment Minister Almoustapha Garba told reporters. The $400 billion (350 billion euro) plan focuses on six projects aiming to limit greenhouse gas emissions and to help people adapt to climate change, he added.


Woman Documents Her Cancer by Perfectly Recreating Famous Characters

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 17:21:02 -0500

Woman Documents Her Cancer by Perfectly Recreating Famous CharactersBeth Pendergrass' Instagram account chronicles her cancer journey with her photos of recreations of famous characters.


How and When to Protect a Baby’s Ears From Loud Noises

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 17:20:05 -0500

How and When to Protect a Baby’s Ears From Loud NoisesInfants have delicate hearing. Parents need to think about protection.


FDA issues seemingly obvious warning against injecting young people's blood to fight aging

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 16:45:47 -0500

FDA issues seemingly obvious warning against injecting young people's blood to fight agingThe theory that young people's blood reverses the effects of aging comes from an experiment on mice.


Samsung's Folding Phone Is a Thick Boy, Just Not in the Way You Actually Need

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 16:16:00 -0500

Samsung's Folding Phone Is a Thick Boy, Just Not in the Way You Actually NeedAlso it starts at $1,980.


SpaceX is set to launch Israel's first lunar lander. Here's what you need to know

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 16:11:58 -0500

SpaceX is set to launch Israel's first lunar lander. Here's what you need to knowThe spacecraft launched by SpaceX will not only be Israel's first lunar mission, but the country's first privately funded one as well.


42 - Gwynne Shotwell

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 16:01:03 -0500

42 - Gwynne ShotwellGwynne Shotwell


Putin Just Threatened the U.S. with New Nukes—But He Actually Backed Himself into a Corner

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 16:01:00 -0500

Putin Just Threatened the U.S. with New Nukes—But He Actually Backed Himself into a CornerRussia’s President Vladimir Putin shot himself in the foot...and is reloading.


Ex-Goldman Banker's Quest for Fresh Food Turns Into a Hit App

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 16:00:00 -0500

Ex-Goldman Banker's Quest for Fresh Food Turns Into a Hit AppWith the Market Kurly app, shoppers can order in the evening and have fresh vegetables, eggs and other perishable foods delivered directly to the doorstep by sunrise. The overnight service has caught on among high-income families with little time to go grocery shopping and is nipping at the heels of chaebol-run companies like E-Mart and Softbank-backed Coupang over the country’s 23-trillion-won ($20 billion) fresh-food market. “Market Kurly is becoming an alternative for hypermarkets like E-Mart, whose sway over fresh foods has been unchallenged until now,” said Kim Hyun-Su, a fund manager at IBK Asset Management.


SoftBank's Fortress to Invest $3.6 Billion in Japanese Property

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 16:00:00 -0500

SoftBank's Fortress to Invest $3.6 Billion in Japanese PropertyThe investment firm will target hotels, onsen spas, office buildings, data centers and condominiums throughout the country, according to Akio Yamashita, Fortress’ representative in Japan. SoftBank bought New York-based Fortress for $3.3 billion in 2017 as billionaire Masayoshi Son began re-positioning his empire as a heavyweight investment house. The Tokyo-based company’s technology will be integrated into the new Japanese properties, including introducing its hotel booking, customer support and revenue management systems, Yamashita said.


8 Reasons Your Face Is Red, and What to Do About It

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 16:00:00 -0500

8 Reasons Your Face Is Red, and What to Do About ItDermatologists weigh in on the most common reasons for redness on your face and how to treat each one, from rosacea to overexfoliation and contact dermatitis.


26 - Donald Hopkins

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 15:59:50 -0500

26 - Donald HopkinsDonald Hopkins


Why do zebras have stripes? They make bad landing strips for flies

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 15:23:27 -0500

Why do zebras have stripes? They make bad landing strips for fliesIt appears stripes make terrible landing strips, bamboozling the fierce blood-sucking flies that try to feast on zebras and carry deadly diseases. Researchers on Wednesday described experiments demonstrating that horse flies have a difficult time landing on zebras while easily landing on uniformly colored horses. "We showed that horse flies approach zebras and uniformly colored horses at similar rates but that they fail to land on zebras - or striped horse coats - because they fail to decelerate properly, and so fly past them or literally bump into them and bounce off," said behavioral ecologist Tim Caro of the University of California-Davis, lead author of the research published in the journal PLOS ONE.


How Much Exercise Do You Need to See Benefits?

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 15:11:16 -0500

How Much Exercise Do You Need to See Benefits?How Much Exercise Do You Need to Get Healthier? R egular exercise is probably the best prescription for healthy aging. But fewer than 1 in 5 adults 65 or older gets the minimum recommended amoun...


How Much Exercise Do You Need to See Benefits?

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 15:11:16 -0500

How Much Exercise Do You Need to See Benefits?How Much Exercise Do You Need to Get Healthier? R egular exercise is probably the best prescription for healthy aging. But fewer than 1 in 5 adults 65 or older gets the minimum recommended amoun...


How Much Exercise Do You Need to See Benefits?

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 15:11:16 -0500

How Much Exercise Do You Need to See Benefits?How Much Exercise Do You Need to Get Healthier? R egular exercise is probably the best prescription for healthy aging. But fewer than 1 in 5 adults 65 or older gets the minimum recommended amoun...


Correction: Obit-Peter Cosgrove story

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 15:08:03 -0500

Correction: Obit-Peter Cosgrove storyORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — In a Feb. 19 obituary of former Associated Press photographer Peter Cosgrove, The Associated Press reported erroneously that astronaut John Glenn was the first man to orbit Earth. Glenn was the first American to do so.


Oil settles 1 percent higher on hopes of market rebalance, trade deal

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 14:59:22 -0500

Oil settles 1 percent higher on hopes of market rebalance, trade dealCrude prices rose more than 1 percent on Wednesday to their highest level this year on hopes that oil markets will balance later this year, helped by output cuts from top producers as well as U.S. sanctions on OPEC members Iran and Venezuela. Market fears over trade talks between the United States and China had helped push oil prices lower in early trade, but the market reversed after signs of progress emerged on Wednesday and strengthened equity markets. U.S. President Donald Trump said negotiations with China were going well and suggested he was open to extending the deadline to complete them beyond March 1, when tariffs on $200 billion worth of Chinese imports are scheduled to rise to 25 percent from 10 percent.


Green New Deal: Why the GOP secretly likes Democrats' climate change plan

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 14:31:50 -0500

Green New Deal: Why the GOP secretly likes Democrats' climate change planIt's not because the GOP supports the transformation of the electric grid away from fossil fuels to renewable energy.


If You Can Do This Many Pushups, You'll Probably Live Longer

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 14:29:00 -0500

If You Can Do This Many Pushups, You'll Probably Live LongerBad news for push up haters.


There’s a “New” American Fighter Called the F-21, But It's Not What You Think

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 14:16:00 -0500

There’s a “New” American Fighter Called the F-21, But It's Not What You ThinkA little bit of rebranding transforms a fighter that debuted in the 1970s into something one step behind the F-22 Raptor.


Free Therapy Dog Sessions Help Those Affected By Alzheimer's Smile, Engage and Transform

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 14:15:13 -0500

Free Therapy Dog Sessions Help Those Affected By Alzheimer's Smile, Engage and TransformAlzheimer's Foundation of America's therapy dog classes are free and open to the public


Neptune's newest, tiniest moon likely piece of bigger one

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 14:04:11 -0500

Neptune's newest, tiniest moon likely piece of bigger oneCAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Neptune's newest and tiniest moon is probably an ancient piece of a much larger moon orbiting unusually close.


20 Absolutely Stunning Pics of the 2019 Super Snow Moon

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 14:02:57 -0500

20 Absolutely Stunning Pics of the 2019 Super Snow MoonIf you were too busy binging Russian Doll last night, then you might have missed a massive celestial wonder: a second 2019 super moon! The super snow moon - aptly named because February is one of the snowiest months of the year - lit up the night sky and made for a truly photo-worthy moment.


Zebra stripes confuse bloodsucking flies and could inspire anti-bug device

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 14:00:00 -0500

Zebra stripes confuse bloodsucking flies and could inspire anti-bug deviceRudyard Kipling supposed the zebra acquired its stripes so it could blend into the forest shadows, hidden away from the leopard and man. But the markings also hold another advantage, scientists have discovered, after finding they disorientate bothersome bloodsucking horse flies. Researchers at Bristol University used video analysis to test whether flies were more likely to attack zebra or non-striped horses at a stables in North Somerset. They found that although flies circled and touched horses and zebras at similar rates, they actually landed on zebras 25 per cent less often. And the footage revealed why.  While flies slowed down substantially before landing on horses, when they approached zebras they failed to decelerate often crashing into the zebra and ricocheting off, as if they weren’t expecting the animal to be so close. Professor Tim Caro, Honorary Research Fellow from the University of Bristol’s School of Biological Sciences, said: “Horse flies just seem to fly over zebra stripes or bump into them, but this didn’t happen with horses. “Consequently, far fewer successful landings were experienced by zebras compared to horses.” Dr Martin How, Royal Society University Research Fellow in the School of Biological Sciences, added: “This reduced ability to land on the zebra’s coat may be due to stripes disrupting the visual system of the horse flies during their final moments of approach. “Stripes may dazzle flies in some way once they are close enough to see them with their low-resolution eyes.” In a second experiment, the researchers dressed horses up as zebras to see if the effect really was being caused by the stripes and not another reason, such as their smell or behaviour. Scientists double-checked the results by dressing up a horse as a zebra Credit: Bristol University  Just as before, when horses wore coats with striped patterns, they experienced fewer horse fly attacks compared to when they wore single-colour coats. Horse flies are a widespread problem for domestic animals so developing coats which resemble zebra stripes may offer relief, the scientists conclude. The research also found that zebra deployed many more tactics to avoid flies, such as running away and swishing their tails at a far higher rate than horses. Consequently, any horse flies that did successfully land on zebras spent less time there compared to those landing on horses, with few staying long enough to probe for a blood meal. In Africa where zebras are native, horse flies carry dangerous debilitating diseases such as trypanosomiasis and African horse sickness which cause wasting and often death, so the development of stripes may be a direct result of the lethal threat, the researchers add. The research was published in the journal PLOS One.


This 1,000-Piece Puzzle Isn't Any Ordinary Jigsaw

Wed, 20 Feb 2019 13:58:00 -0500

This 1,000-Piece Puzzle Isn't Any Ordinary JigsawA different kind of puzzle, a different kind of challenge